Raising AKC Siberian Huskies in the Heart of Wisconsin. Puppies occasionally available. WI State Kennel License #271765-DS
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Siberian Husky FAQ

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Are you interested in buying a Siberian Husky? Then, you've already heard how marvelous they are. We think you should also be told that they do have their shortcomings, and may not make the ideal pet for everyone who is attracted to them.

Siberians are a gregarious lot and need the company of other dogs or of people at all times. If you work all day, or have room for only one dog . . . don't buy a Siberian.

While capable of strong affection for his family, the Siberian Husky is also very friendly with strangers. So, if you want the fierce loyalty of a one-man dog . . . don't buy a Siberian.

The Siberian Husky is not a watch dog, although those ignorant of his true nature may be frightened by his appearance. If you want a dog with aggressive guard-dog instincts . . . don't buy a Siberian.

At least once a year Siberians shed their coats. If you like fur all over the house and in the very air you breathe, then fine. If, however, you value neatness at all times, then . . . don't buy a Siberian.

Siberian Huskies have a natural proclivity for digging holes in backyards. If you take great pride in your landscaping efforts . . . don't buy a Siberian.

Of all the shortcomings to be found in Siberians, the most dangerous to the pet owner is their tremendous desire to RUN. But the very first dash that a puppy makes across the road could be his last run, anywhere. A Siberian, for his own protection, should be kept confined or under control at all times. If you are one of those people who think it is cruel to kennel a dog, or keep him confined in his own backyard . . . don't buy a Siberian.

If you have read this far, honestly feel that you qualify on all counts, and are still determined to own a Siberian, then we take great pleasure in welcoming you to the fold. Join the rest of us in the smug complacency of knowing that we own the most beautiful, the smartest, the most nearly ideal dog in the world . . . the SIBERIAN HUSKY!

 

Siberian Husky FAQ:
Courtesy of Jalerran Siberian Huskies

1.  Can I play Frisbee in the park with my Siberian Husky?
Definitely NOT!
Wandering Star - This breed should never be trusted off-lead. They will run and they won't come back when you call them. Don't be fooled into thinking that you can train them to stay in your yard. The many people who have tried and no longer have their dogs can attest to the risk associated with this impossible task.

2.  How should I fence in my yard for my Husky?
Houdini Lives - Siberians are escape artists. Siberians need a SECURELY fenced in yard if you want to let them off a leash.
Define SECURELY...
Over - They can jump or climb most fenced-in areas. Six feet is the recommended height. If your dog is a climber, you may need a roof for your 'kennel'.
Under - They will also very easily dig out underneath the fence, so it is recommended that if the fence is not placed upon concrete then something should be buried along the perimeter of the fence in order to properly contain them.
Through - Leaving them in a yard or kennel unattended for great lengths is not appropriate for this breed as they are highly intelligent and they WILL find a way out. If the fence is made of a weak gauge of chain link that isn't securely attached, they can push the fence up or chew through it. This can also occur with wood.
No other alternatives - Because they are sled pullers, tying your Siberian out is not appropriate as not only will they escape, other neighborhood dogs then have open access to him/her. They are social animals and will want to be with you.
Underground or 'invisible' fences are also not effective for this breed. They learn very quickly that with a good running start, they can get past the range of the fence. Additionally, their thick fur interferes with the effectiveness of the collar.

3.  Is it true that Siberians dig holes and shed? 
Yes.
Green Thumb - They instinctively dig and will leave large holes, even trenches, throughout your yard.
Kirby vs. Hoover - Do you own a good vacuum? Twice a year, Siberians do what is referred to as "blowing coat" where they lose their bottom layer of fur, or undercoat. It is a mess! It generally takes at least a week, sometimes more, for all of the fur to leave the coat. You could brush the dog from sun-up until sun-down and the fur would still be coming out. This is not an exaggeration. When a Siberian is not 'blowing coat', the amount of shedding is minimal to moderate, depending on the climate.

4.  Are Siberians high energy dogs?
Yes and No. Each dog is an individual and energy levels vary, but as a general rule, they do have lots of energy. If you do not give them enough mental and physical exercise they will become hyperactive.
High Voltage - This is a high energy breed, especially for the first two years of life. They are not usually suited for people who won't provide any exercise opportunities for the dog or leave them in a crate for long periods of time. Crate training is recommended both for the safety of your home, but also for the safety of the puppy; however, if your work schedule has you away from the house for much more than 8 hours a day, you will come home to a very anxious puppy!

5. Will my Siberian listen to me?
Who's the Boss? - Because the Siberian is a pack animal, they will establish a hierarchy, or 'pecking order' for dominance. Puppy kindergarten classes and general obedience classes are highly recommended for proper socialization and training. Consistency with training is extremely important or a Siberian will 'walk all over you'. Siberians should be outgoing and friendly. Proper socialization and training should help to ensure that your puppy or dog learns manners. People who have owned a Siberian are typically familiar with the saying, "Being Owned By A Siberian". Allowing a dog to "Own" you is NOT recommended. Be sure to be your dogs Pack Leader!

6. Will my Siberian get along with other dogs or my cat?
Snack Time - This breed has a high level predatory instinct and they will hunt cats, birds, and other smaller animals. Sometimes, when a Siberian is raised with a cat, owners have had success with this integration; however, in most cases when an older Siberian is introduced to a home with a cat, the Siberian cannot be trusted.
Every dog is different, so it is difficult to generalize concerning their adaptability with other dogs. Their ability to get along with other dogs, as with any breed of dog, also stems back to their level of dominance and 'status' within the hierarchy.

 

Siberian Husky

AKC MEET THE BREEDS®: Siberian Husky

Bred in Northeast Asia as a sled dog, the Siberian Husky is known for its amazing endurance and willingness to work. Its agreeable and outgoing temperament makes it a great all-around dog, suitable for anything from sledding to therapy work. Because it originated in cold climates, Siberians have a thicker coat then most other breeds of dog, made up of a dense cashmere-like undercoat and a longer, coarse top coat. All colors from black to pure white are allowed, and a variety of markings on the head is common.

A Look Back
The Siberian Husky is widely believed to have originated from within the Chukchi Tribe, off the eastern Siberian peninsula. These dogs were used in 1908 for the All-Alaskan Sweepstakes, which consisted of a 408 mile long dogsled race, and served in the Army’s Arctic Search and Rescue Unit during World War II.

Right Breed for You?
Siberians are relatively easy keepers, but their thick coats require weekly brushing. New owners should be prepared to provide an outlet for exercise daily, whether through walks or an enclosed space in which to run. Predatory instincts are strong, so Siberians should be supervised around small animals in and around the home.

Working Group; AKC recognized in 1930.
Ranging in size from 20 to 23 ˝ inches tall at the shoulder and 35 to 60 pounds.
Sled dog.

© The American Kennel Club, Inc.


Siberian Husky Breed Standard

Working Group

General Appearance
The Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog, quick and light on his feet and free and graceful in action. His moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest his Northern heritage. His characteristic gait is smooth and seemingly effortless. He performs his original function in harness most capably, carrying a light load at a moderate speed over great distances. His body proportions and form reflect this basic balance of power, speed and endurance. The males of the Siberian Husky breed are masculine but never coarse; the bitches are feminine but without weakness of structure. In proper condition, with muscle firm and well developed, the Siberian Husky does not carry excess weight.

Size, Proportion, Substance
Height--Dogs, 21 to 23˝ inches at the withers. Bitches, 20 to 22 inches at the withers. Weight--Dogs, 45 to 60 pounds. Bitches, 35 to 50 pounds. Weight is in proportion to height. The measurements mentioned above represent the extreme height and weight limits with no preference given to either extreme. Any appearance of excessive bone or weight should be penalized. In profile, the length of the body from the point of the shoulder to the rear point of the croup is slightly longer than the height of the body from the ground to the top of the withers. Disqualification--Dogs over 23˝ inches and bitches over 22 inches.

Head
Expression is keen, but friendly; interested and even mischievous. Eyes almond shaped, moderately spaced and set a trifle obliquely. Eyes may be brown or blue in color; one of each or parti-colored are acceptable. Faults--Eyes set too obliquely; set too close together. Ears of medium size, triangular in shape, close fitting and set high on the head. They are thick, well furred, slightly arched at the back, and strongly erect, with slightly rounded tips pointing straight up. Faults--Ears too large in proportion to the head; too wide set; not strongly erect. Skull of medium size and in proportion to the body; slightly rounded on top and tapering from the widest point to the eyes. Faults--Head clumsy or heavy; head too finely chiseled. Stop--The stop is well-defined and the bridge of the nose is straight from the stop to the tip. Fault--Insufficient stop. Muzzle of medium length; that is, the distance from the tip of the nose to the stop is equal to the distance from the stop to the occiput. The muzzle is of medium width, tapering gradually to the nose, with the tip neither pointed nor square. Faults Muzzle either too snipy or too coarse; muzzle too short or too long. Nose black in gray, tan or black dogs; liver in copper dogs; may be flesh-colored in pure white dogs. The pink-streaked "snow nose" is acceptable. Lips are well pigmented and close fitting. Teeth closing in a scissors bite. Fault--Any bite other than scissors.

Neck, Topline, Body
Neck medium in length, arched and carried proudly erect when dog is standing. When moving at a trot, the neck is extended so that the head is carried slightly forward. Faults--Neck too short and thick; neck too long. Chest deep and strong, but not too broad, with the deepest point being just behind and level with the elbows. The ribs are well sprung from the spine but flattened on the sides to allow for freedom of action. Faults--Chest too broad; "barrel ribs"; ribs too flat or weak. Back--The back is straight and strong, with a level topline from withers to croup. It is of medium length, neither cobby nor slack from excessive length. The loin is taut and lean, narrower than the rib cage, and with a slight tuck-up. The croup slopes away from the spine at an angle, but never so steeply as to restrict the rearward thrust of the hind legs. Faults--Weak or slack back; roached back; sloping topline.

Tail
The well furred tail of fox-brush shape is set on just below the level of the topline, and is usually carried over the back in a graceful sickle curve when the dog is at attention. When carried up, the tail does not curl to either side of the body, nor does it snap flat against the back. A trailing tail is normal for the dog when in repose. Hair on the tail is of medium length and approximately the same length on top, sides and bottom, giving the appearance of a round brush. Faults--A snapped or tightly curled tail; highly plumed tail; tail set too low or too high.

Forequarters
Shoulders--The shoulder blade is well laid back. The upper arm angles slightly backward from point of shoulder to elbow, and is never perpendicular to the ground. The muscles and ligaments holding the shoulder to the rib cage are firm and well developed. Faults--Straight shoulders; loose shoulders. Forelegs--When standing and viewed from the front, the legs are moderately spaced, parallel and straight, with the elbows close to the body and turned neither in nor out. Viewed from the side, pasterns are slightly slanted, with the pastern joint strong, but flexible. Bone is substantial but never heavy. Length of the leg from elbow to ground is slightly more than the distance from the elbow to the top of withers. Dewclaws on forelegs may be removed. Faults--Weak pasterns; too heavy bone; too narrow or too wide in the front; out at the elbows. Feet oval in shape but not long. The paws are medium in size, compact and well furred between the toes and pads. The pads are tough and thickly cushioned. The paws neither turn in nor out when the dog is in natural stance. Faults--Soft or splayed toes; paws too large and clumsy; paws too small and delicate; toeing in or out.

Hindquarters
When standing and viewed from the rear, the hind legs are moderately spaced and parallel. The upper thighs are well muscled and powerful, the stifles well bent, the hock joint well-defined and set low to the ground. Dewclaws, if any, are to be removed. Faults--Straight stifles, cow-hocks, too narrow or too wide in the rear.

Coat
The coat of the Siberian Husky is double and medium in length, giving a well furred appearance, but is never so long as to obscure the clean-cut outline of the dog. The undercoat is soft and dense and of sufficient length to support the outer coat. The guard hairs of the outer coat are straight and somewhat smooth lying, never harsh nor standing straight off from the body. It should be noted that the absence of the undercoat during the shedding season is normal. Trimming of whiskers and fur between the toes and around the feet to present a neater appearance is permissible. Trimming the fur on any other part of the dog is not to be condoned and should be severely penalized. Faults--Long, rough, or shaggy coat; texture too harsh or too silky; trimming of the coat, except as permitted above.

Color
All colors from black to pure white are allowed. A variety of markings on the head is common, including many striking patterns not found in other breeds.

Gait
The Siberian Husky's characteristic gait is smooth and seemingly effortless. He is quick and light on his feet, and when in the show ring should be gaited on a loose lead at a moderately fast trot, exhibiting good reach in the forequarters and good drive in the hindquarters. When viewed from the front to rear while moving at a walk the Siberian Husky does not single-track, but as the speed increases the legs gradually angle inward until the pads are falling on a line directly under the longitudinal center of the body. As the pad marks converge, the forelegs and hind legs are carried straightforward, with neither elbows nor stifles turned in or out. Each hind leg moves in the path of the foreleg on the same side. While the dog is gaiting, the topline remains firm and level. Faults--Short, prancing or choppy gait, lumbering or rolling gait; crossing or crabbing.

Temperament
The characteristic temperament of the Siberian Husky is friendly and gentle, but also alert and outgoing. He does not display the possessive qualities of the guard dog, nor is he overly suspicious of strangers or aggressive with other dogs. Some measure of reserve and dignity may be expected in the mature dog. His intelligence, tractability, and eager disposition make him an agreeable companion and willing worker.

Summary
The most important breed characteristics of the Siberian Husky are medium size, moderate bone, well balanced proportions, ease and freedom of movement, proper coat, pleasing head and ears, correct tail, and good disposition. Any appearance of excessive bone or weight, constricted or clumsy gait, or long, rough coat should be penalized. The Siberian Husky never appears so heavy or coarse as to suggest a freighting animal; nor is he so light and fragile as to suggest a sprint-racing animal. In both sexes the Siberian Husky gives the appearance of being capable of great endurance. In addition to the faults already noted, the obvious structural faults common to all breeds are as undesirable in the Siberian Husky as in any other breed, even though they are not specifically mentioned herein.

Disqualification
Dogs over 23˝ inches and bitches over 22 inches.

Approved October 9, 1990
Effective November 28, 1990

© 2010-2012 TCK Siberian Huskies & Windrise Designs - All rights reserved. Last Updated August 23, 2012